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20121101
20121130
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KRCB (PBS) 24
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English 24
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the battle between israel and hamas, the palestinian group that rules gaza. air strikes echoed across gaza, and rockets landed near tel aviv and, for the first time, near jerusalem. the combined death toll reached 30-- 27 palestinians and three israelis. we begin with a report from john ray of independent television news in gaza. >> reporter: a sleepless night in gaza gave way to another morning of missiles. israel promised a lull in their assault, a chance for words to speak louder than bombs. but on neither side was there a cease-fire. and if the egyptian prime minster came armed with a peace plan, he kept it to himself. this was far more a display of muslim brotherhood with hamas. hesham qandeel called gaza a tragedy, and israel the aggressor. the tragedy is deeply personal, and it unfolds at the gaza city hospital where they rush the dead and the injured. boys like yea, just ten years old. "i was buying bread for my mother," he says, "when the rocket came." dooah, a girl of 14, was hit my shrapnel on her way to a wedding. "all i remember is the flash of red light," she tells me. israel
-fire in the conflict between israel and hamas and we talk to huff benn from "ha'aretz." >> i think a cease-fire will be put in place. i hope it will happen wiin the next 24ours to preven and avd and do without the ground invasion with its deadly cost and then when it takes the place with the new leader of hamas who has to impose the cease-fire on all the other groups in gaza who are aiming at launching rockets or firing into israeli territory. but at the same time, clearly israel will have to let go some of its black cade of gaza. >> rose: also, david ignatius of the "washington post" from washington. >> on the larger question here of whether the obama administration before the election had an interest in minimizing the public's understanding that al qaeda still posed a threat, a different threat from the one that we were used to with bin laden but a threat nonetheless, i think the answer increasingly yes s yes. they didn't want the public to see that effort as anything other than a great success. that was part of obama's appeal. so i'd say on the particular details, i don't see much. on t
. >> wooddruff: there are new fears tonight of a widening conflict between israel and hamas after a major escalation today-- more than 20 air strikes and at least ten palestinians dead ray suarez reports. ( sirens ) >> suarez: it began with a precision air strike that left twisted metal and flaming debris on the streets of gaza city. the target: ahmed jabari, head of the military wing of the militant group hamas, which rules gaza. he was at the top of israel's most wanted list and the most senior hamas official killed since israel's last war in gaza in 2009. the israeli military posted video of the strike on you tube and said it was the opening round of a larger campaign dubbed "operation: pillar of defense." >> the goal of the operation is to defend israeli people and also target and cripple those terror organizations responsible for the ongoing rocket fire-- namely hamas, islamic jihad and others. >> suarez: in short order, smoke rose across the gaza city skyline from other air strikes, and fires burned into the night as the attacks continued. and prime minister benjamin netanyahu warne
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: israel and hamas agreed to a cease-fire today, ending eight days of deadly conflict. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight: we have reports from tel aviv, gaza, and cairo. and ray suarez examines the prospects ahead for the peace deal. >> woodruff: then, margaret warner reports from turkey where the syrian civil war is having an impact along the shared 500 mile border and in ankara. >> with fighting in syrian areas, spilling over into turkish towns, turkey finds itself walking a fine line between defending its interests, and being drawn into a regional war. >> brown: after the deluge: we assess the impact of all the money spent in the most expensive campaign in history. >> woodruff: as recovery costs from superstorm sandy continue to rise,aul solman looks at weather risks and the business of insurance. >> all insurance companies are paying very careful attention to the variability and the volatility in the climate. >> brown: and poet joy harjo celebrates the focal p
resistance to israel, controls gaza. after long opposing abbas's u.n. efforts, the militant hamas recently endorsed the move. >> ( translated ): the hamas movement is with all the diplomacy acts that adds to the palestinian victories. we welcome the step for statehood at the united nations but we want it to be through a national program based on the resistance and keeps the palestinian rights. >> warner: general assembly recognition would put palestine on a par with the vatican at the u.n., but would not grant full representation. last year, abbas failed to win full u.n. membership for a state of palestine. the u.s. is opposed to even limited recognition, saying it will endanger prospects for a negotiated settlement with israel. state department spokeswoman victoria nuland issued that warning again today. >> we are concerned that this vote is going to make the work of getting... the work of getting the parties back to the table more difficult. >> warner: but the palestinians' u.n. representative riyad mansour voiced the opposite view yesterday. >> it should be respected by everyone and we
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: israel aimed a new wave of deadly airstrikes at gaza today, and hamas fighters sent a volley of rockets into southern israel, six days after the escalation began. good evening. i'm judy wdruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we have reports from gaza city and tel aviv, and talk with journalist nancy youssef in cairo, where diplomatic efforts to broker peace are under way. >> woodruff: then, we turn to the other hot conflict in the middle east, in syria. margaret warner takes us inside the opposition forces and examines turkey's efforts to help the rebels. >> gist around this corner down this cobblestone street is a back alley where you can fiefned a whole underground economy. an underground economy that helps keep the syrian resistance going. >> brown: president obama makes an historic trip to myanmar. ray suarez looks at the asian country's steps away from a closed military dictatorship. >> woodruff: paul solman reports from the rockaways on new york's long island about insurance woes for v
for israel and hamas show little sign of letting up. more than 130 people have died in a week of fighting. israeli forces carried out air strikes and fired shells at the gaza strip in the latest round. the conflict has so far killed 130 palestinians. hamas and other palestinian militants are counter attacking by firing rockets and motor shells into israel. they killed two more israelis bringing the number of dead on that side to five. hundreds of people in gaza are taking refuge at schools run by the u.n. palestinian refugees account for more than 70% of gaza's population. they were forced off their land after the 1948 founding of israel and during subsequent wars. >> translator: i don't think this place is safe because they attacked u.n. schools before and i just hope we'll be safe. >> u.n. secretary general and u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton visited israel to lend their weight to mediation efforts. >> the goal must be a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advances the security and legitimate aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. >> egyptian diplomats
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> sreenivasan: the ceasefire between israel and hamas held firm today, as a semblance of normal life resumed in gaza and israeli troops began moving away from the border. good evening, i'm hari sreenivasan. on the "newshour" tonight, we get on-the-ground reports about the state of the fragile peace, even as both sides vowed to act if the truce is violated. then, we turn to greece's financial crisis. paul solman offers an inside look at the negotiations to tackle the debt problems. >> as both knowledgeable outsiders and insiders attest, the tug-of-war between europe's borrowers and lenders continues and probably will, for years. >> sreenivasan: many americans are headed to the mall tonight after finishing thanksgiving dinner. we examine how black friday has morphed into gray thursday. jeffrey brown has another thanksgiving day story about a turn of the century photographer who dumented the lis of native aricans. >> he ended up being the largest traffic odyssey in american history. he ended up doing 2,200 pages of text telling l
diplomacy aimed at stopping the battle of air strikes and rockets between israel and hamas. rumors of a cease-fire flew all day, and secretary of state clinton arrived in the region after nightfall. she met first with israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu, and called for more than just a temporary truce. >> the rocket attacks from terrorist organizations inside gaza on israeli cities and towns must end and a broader calm restored. the goal must be a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advances the security and legitimate aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. >> brown: prime minister netanyahu said he'll take whatever military action is necessary. underscoring that point, the israelis launched new air strikes after dark. we have a report from john ray of independent television news in gaza. and a warning, some of the images may be disturbing. >> reporter: they packed in a panic, loading cars and donkey carts. tonight israel warned palestinians to evacuate the border, to head to the safety of gaza city wher. whether war or peace was heading their way, t
the world. teachers in israel are using oragami but not to make betiful fires. >> reporter: math teachers began using oragami about ten years ago. students are making geometry shapes. >> translator: when it comes to solving problems i find that oragami makes it easier. >> reporter: the teacher brought the craft to schools. when she was a child she watched a tv show about oragami. then she started making her own. 20 years ago she visited japan. it fascinated her. upon her return to israel she visited schools all over the country. she tried to introduce oragami as a teaching school. >> they laughed at me and said you ku go to the community center and teach a class. i really believed in it. >> reporter: her husband supported her through thick and thin. he's an oragami designer and the two meet at an international oragami event. through trial and error they figured out how to use it in math classes. >> i can fold a piece of paper. i'm in control. it's my body that's making it. my hands, my eyes, my brain. there's a fantastic sense of achievement even if you do the simplest thing when you're f
'd garnered worldwide praise for mediating a cease-fire between israel and hamas. today, he told a supportive crowd outside the presidential palace in cairo that granting himself sweeping powers was necessary to prevent figures from the old regime from halting progress. >> ( translated ): i haven't taken a decision to use it against anyone-- to go against anyone is something that i could never be associated with-- or announcing that i am biased towards anyone. however, i must put myself on a clear path that will lead to the achievement of a clear goal. >> brown: the president's backers insisted the decree would be in effect only until a new constitution is approved. >> ( translated ): yes, he might be a dictator for the time being or might have unprecedented power throughout this period of two months, but after that, these powers will be transferred to an elected parliament. >> brown: but tens of thousands of anti-morsi protesters rallied in tahrir square, the heart of last year's popular revolution that led to end of the regime of hosni mubarak. they threw rocks at riot police, who retaliate
of a ceasefire in the fighting between hamas and israel in the gaza strip. the announcement came after a week of rocket attacks and counter-attacks that has killed an estimated 150 people. most of the dead are palestinians. and just before that agreement to end hostilities, a bomb exploded in a tel aviv bus station injuring 27. >> tom: i don't wake up trying to solve for wall street, i wake up trying to solve for our members and customers each and every day. still ahead, we talk health care reform with florida's largest health insurer, chairman and c.e.o. of florida blue, patrick gerahty joins us. >> tom: among the taxes scheduled to go up on new year's day if there is no solution to the fiscal cliff e taxeon dividends and capital gains. 403 of the 500 companies in the s&p 500 stock index now pay investors to hold their stock. that's the highest number since 1999. these companies paid shareholders a record $34 billion in cash in august alone. the threat of higher taxes on investments has hit stocks of traditional dividend payors, such as utility stocks. the sector exchange traded fund has fal
a state established years ago, and that is israel. rather, we came to affirm the legitimacy of a state that must now achieve its independence, and this is palestine. >> sreenivasan: palestinians said the vote would strengthen their hand in future peace talks with israel. but the israeli ambassador to the u.n., ron prosor, warned that the palestinians are turning their backs on peace. >> for as long as president abbas prefers symbolism over reality, as long as he prefers to travel to new york for u.n. resolutions rather than travel to jerusalem for genuine dialogue, any hope of peace will be out of reach. >> sreenivasan: meanwhile, a bipartisan group of u.s. senators said today they will push to cut off u.s. aid, if the palestinians use their new status to bring israel before the international criminal court. in iraq, a wave of attacks today killed at least 43 people. most of the victims were in the city of hillah, south of baghdad. back-to-back explosions targeted shi-ite pilgrims and emergency responders. the force of the blasts left twisted wreckage of cars outside shops in a busy co
the country. >>> israel's prime minister said again and again he's willing to use military force to stop iran from making a nuclear weapon. two years ago benjamin netanyahu took them to the brink of a strike. he met with senior ministers and advisors. the armed forces chief of sff reportedly opposed the plan. he argued that the military lacked the capability to have a successful strike. he pushed him to get an agreement. they both retired last year. they have been vocal critics of netanyahu ever since. he told the u.n. general assembly he could set a deadline of next is summer at the latestr iran to halt its nuclear program. >>> afghan leaders are preparing for the withdrawal of u.s. troops in 2014. government officials have begun a new program to encourage taliban soldiers to leave their posts and integrate into local communities. >> reporter: in the center of the province a ceremony is held for fighters who are renouncing their membership in militant group and reintegrating into society. >> translator: i have fought for over ten years. many of my comrades were injured. i'm tired of this. >>
in benghazi? do we talk about sexual liaisons and e-mails and national security? to talk about israel and gaza. the possibility of a deal to avoid going off the fiscal clf? let's art th the sex. [laughter] general david petraeus had an affair with his biographer, paula broadwell, a married mother of two pit talk about unlimited access. general petraeus was set to testify as we were recording this program, so we don't know what he said yet. >> we are safer because of the work that dave petraeus has done. my main hope right now is that he and his family are able to move on, and that this ends up being a single side note on what has otherwise been an extraordinary career. >> ordinary career. david petraeus is a highly decorated -- extraordinary career. david petraeus is a highly decorated general with a ph.d. from princeton university. roger, you have been around for awhile. how does a smart man like that get into a mess like this? >> like heaid, let's get to the sex. he is america's spymaster, aside from the degrees and all that. but he decides to conduct an affair through a gmail account, becau
-fire between israel and hamas. concern was growing about more trouble in cairo tomorrow. this afternoon, the muzz lum brotherhood spokesman said the party had postponed demonstrations tuesday to avoid bloodshed. >> brown: a short while ago i spoke with nancy youssef. nan nancy youssef, let's begin with the latest statements from president morsi's spokesman. it's hard to know whether the president is backing off or simply clarifying the pronouncements he made late last week. how is it being red in cairo? >> >> reporter: that's exactly how it feels here after several days of protests, and tents in tahrir square, the scene that led to the overthrough of the previous regime. a spokesman came out saying he would have the final say over all sovereign matters. what constitutes a sovereign matter remains unclear. it seems they could be as broad or as specific as morsi wants. and under that agreement, he has ultimate say oaf those matters, and there's nobod who can overrule his decision. and that could apply to thingses like the commit they will draft the permanent constitution among other legal
administered by the agents of israel. >> the time has come to maybe try to find the proof of what has happened and to bring justice. i think he deserves and the palestinian people deserve it. >> reporter: to palestinians he was the ultimate fighter for freedom. to israelis, the face of terror. they cornered him first in lebanon and then to his west bankhead quarters. allowed at last into exile he died officially from a stroke. but traces of highly toxic polonium were recently found on his clothes. the israeli secret services finally get their man. >> did israel murder, assassinate, get rid of yasser arafat. >> i can tell you a definite absolute no. they used to say that we, that our snipers had arafat on their sights and the decision was not to kill him. >> reporter: whatever dark secret this grave might or might not reveal, the timing is fortuitous. in the very week that palestinians applied to the united nations for recognition. a significant step towards the fulfillment of yasser arafat's life work. after arafat's death, experts warned after so many years definitive answers are likely to re
and israel in the gaza strip holds, many thi prices at the pump will drift lower. it also helps that u.s. refineries are producing ample supplies of gasoline. a.a.a. expects regular unleaded to end the year between $3.10 and $3.30 a gallon. but longer term, the price of gasoline depends on the strength of the global economy. >> my outlook right now for gasoline prices is, we are going to continue to come off some more? the thing with gasoline, you can't shove it down people's throats. they just don't have the money for higher oil prices. hence, that's going to put a cap on it. >> reporter: with only about a month left, 2012 is expected to be the most expensive year for gasoline ever. americans are expected to spend about $12 billion more to fill up their tanks this year compared to last. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: what determines gas prices? as erika just reported, there's more to it than supply and demand. to learn more about prices at the pump, visit our web site, www.nbr.com, and look for the "nbr-u" tab. >> tom: while gas prices remain over $3 a gallon, the auto in
evidence of that. of t dspite? >> of the dispute? >> ifill: well, richard murdoch. >> israel, rished murdoch became almost the third rail of local politics. even though what he said, you know, was consistent with-- it was-- and not indefensible. there appeared to be a callous, almost disregard for the terrible experience of being raped, let alone a pregnancy coming out of that rape. >> you talk about the gender issue. it's always important to stinguish between married women and single women. >> that's right. >> married women were very strongly for republicans, single women very strongly for democrats. the sociological trend over the past 20 years is there are a lot more single people, men and women. so the numbers just get bigger as the country goes into what they call living solo. >> woodruff: and it calls to mind the strategy that obama very transparently employed, talking about planned parenthood, talking about the position of the republicans on-- not just on abortion but on contraception, and there was a lot of criticism-- has be a lot of criticism-- >> i've heard criticism from
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)